FAMM Supports “Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Inmates” Act | FAMM

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FAMM Supports “Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Inmates” Act

Categories: Blog, Department of Justice, Featured, Federal Bureau of Prisons, Newsroom, Press Release

Contact: Rabiah Burks
rburks@famm.org
202-822-6700

FAMM Supports “Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Inmates” Act

WASHINGTON – FAMM supports the “Protecting the Health and Wellness of Babies and Pregnant Inmates” Act, introduced today by Reps. Karen Bass (D-CA), Mia Love (R-UT), and Katherine Clark (D-MA). The bill, if passed, would severely limit the shackling and restrictive housing of prisoners during pregnancy, labor, and postpartum recovery, as well as hold the Bureau of Prisons (BOP) accountable to ensure these directives are being followed.

“Shackling pregnant women is disgusting and inhumane. Prohibiting this barbaric practice is a no-brainer,” said Kevin Ring, president of FAMM. “We applaud and support the efforts of Reps. Bass, Love and Clark to ensure that women in prison get treated with dignity and respect during one of the most vulnerable times in their lives.”

The bill would also:

  • Create a minimum standard of healthcare and training to ensure that pregnant women and newborns are receiving the quality of pre- and post-natal care required for a healthy mother and child;
  • Fund technical assistance and training to state and local agencies to ensure that restraints and restrictive housing are used legally and correctly; and
  • Require the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to conduct a survey of services and protections for pregnant prisoners in local and state correctional facilities.

FAMM urges Congress to pass this bill and ensure the safety of newborns and their mothers.

FAMM is a nonpartisan, national advocacy organization that promotes fair and effective criminal justice reforms to make our communities safe. Founded in 1991, FAMM promotes change by raising the voices of families and individuals who are directly affected by counterproductive sentencing and prison policies.