Two Weeks Left to Impact 51,000 Lives

Post Date: June 23, 2014

Have you written to the U.S. Sentencing Commission yet to tell them to lower drug sentences for federal prisoners? There’s still time! We have two weeks left to inundate the Commission with letters and emails urging them to “make Amendment #3 retroactive, without limitations!”

Amendment #3 would give 51,000 federal drug prisoners a chance to apply for lower sentences – almost two years lower, on average. Over 4,000 people would be eligible for immediate release from prison if this happens! And 394 people would be released instead of dying in prison!

This opportunity exists because the U.S. Sentencing Commission decided to lower drug sentences by two levels for everyone who gets sentenced AFTER November 1st. FAMM believes that everyone in prison also deserves the benefit of the new drug sentencing guideline. Justice shouldn’t be based on what day you are sentenced!

We also don’t believe any drug prisoner should be excluded from retroactivity, even though the Department of Justice wants to exclude certain prisoners.

That’s why we need you and your family and friends to write to the U.S. Sentencing Commission NOW! Tell them to “make Amendment #3 retroactive without limitations!”  Your letter must be in the Commission’s hands by July 7th.
 
Click here to write to the Commission (you’ll see a new sample letter to help you get started).

BY MAIL:
U.S. Sentencing Commission
Attn: Public Affairs-Retroactivity Public Comment
One Columbus Circle NE
Suite 2-500
Washington, DC 20002-8002

BY E-MAIL:
Public_comment@ussc.gov

And if you haven’t been following this issue until now, here is a little background to catch you up (you can also read our FAQ here):

Let’s make our voices heard! We want thousands of letters of support for Amendment #3 to reach the U.S. Sentencing Commission by July 7th. The stakes are so high – 51,000 people could gain freedom early!

Thank you for helping us fight for liberty!

Best,

Julie

Julie Stewart
President and Founder
Families Against Mandatory Minimums