SITSA Act, H.R. 2851 (115th Congress)

H.R. 2851, SITSA Act
Introduced by: Rep. John Katko (R-NY-24)
Text of bill: Click here for the full text of this legislation

Take Action: Tell Congress to oppose H.R. 2851!

The SITSA Act, H.R. 2851, is problematic because it (1) lacks criminal intent (mens rea) standards; (2) creates harsh new mandatory minimum sentences for offenses that lack mens rea; and (3) lets a government bureaucrat, not Congress, decide what is and is not a drug offense. The SITSA Act would allow the attorney general, without court review or congressional approval, to vastly expand the number of synthetic and analogue drugs that carry criminal penalties under federal law. The bill would also create new, 20-year mandatory minimum sentencing laws for anyone who imports one of these synthetic or analogue drugs, if death or serious bodily injury results from the use of that drug. This mandatory minimum sentence will be applied to people even if they did not know or intend for the drug to cause injury or death. FAMM opposes H.R. 2851.  

Summary: Read our detailed summary of H.R. 2851 and how it would vastly increase the scope of federal drug laws and mandatory minimum sentences.

Bill Status: The bill has not become law. We do not know if or when this bill could become law. To become a law, a bill must be approved by the Judiciary Committee, passed by the U.S. House of Representatives, passed by the U.S. Senate, and signed by the President. It takes a long time to pass a bill into law, and very few bills become laws each year. 

Keep checking this page for updates on the bill’s progress.