Reform Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Laws, Witnesses Tell Senate Committee

Post Date: September 18, 2013

WASHINGTON, D.C. — At a packed public hearing of the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee, a former federal prosecutor and the director of a conservative criminal justice reform group called on U.S. Senators to roll back federal mandatory minimum sentencing laws. These witnesses told committee members that one-size-fits-all penalties do more harm than good, a message confirmed by the dozens of FAMM members who traveled from across the country to attend the hearing.

“Today’s hearing was a small step in the legislative process, but a giant leap for sentencing reform,” said FAMM president Julie Stewart. “I am encouraged by what I heard this morning. The senators seemed to recognize that mandatory minimum sentencing laws are a terrible deal for taxpayers. They understand that we can improve public safety without wasting so many lives and so much money.”

Judiciary Committee chairman Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT), the co-author with Sen. Rand Paul (R-KY) of the Justice Safety Valve Act of 2013, said, “The number of mandatory minimum penalties in the federal code nearly doubled from 1991 to 2011. Many of those mandatory minimums originated right here in this Committee room. When I look at the evidence we have now, I realize we were wrong. Our reliance on a one-size-fits-all approach to sentencing has been a great mistake. Mandatory minimums are costly, unfair, and do not make our country safer.” 

Sen. Paul told committee members, “Each case should be judged on its own merits. Mandatory minimums prevent this from happening. Mandatory minimum sentencing has done little to address the very real problem of drug abuse while also doing great damage by destroying so many lives.”

The committee also heard from Brett Tolman, a former federal prosecutor in Utah. Tolman criticized how mandatory minimums were used in drug cases. He said, “The threat of long mandatory minimum sentences has not resulted in the identification of high-level leaders of drug organizations by low-level targets, primarily because “kingpins” are smarter than that – they insulate themselves so the “mules” and street-corner dealers either do not know who they are or do not have enough information to lead to their discovery let alone prosecution. As a result, the long federal sentences routinely go to the lower-level targets while the “kingpins” and their drug trafficking operations continue to thrive.”

Marc Levin, the policy director
of the Right on Crime Initiative at the Texas Public Policy Foundation, testified about the great progress states across the country have made in reducing crime while reforming their sentencing laws. Mr. Levin noted that the remarkable Texas has achieved in reducing its prison population and crime rate through use of recidivism-reducing programs and alternative sanctions would not have been possible if the state had more mandatory minimum sentencing laws.

More than 40 FAMM members from across the country attended the hearing this morning, many carrying pictures of loved ones serving excessive mandatory minimum prison terms. At the conclusion of the hearing, Chairman Leahy acknowledged the family members who made the effort to attend the hearing by asking FAMM members to stand.

Ms. Stewart and FAMM member Lisa Angelos, whose brother is serving a 55-year mandatory minimum sentence, submitted written statements at the hearing. Click here to read Ms. Stewart’s testimony, and click here to read Ms. Angelos’s statement. 

FAMM is a nonpartisan, nonprofit organization that advocates for fair, individualized, and proportionate sentences that fit the crime and the individual while protecting public safety.  Contact Monica Pratt Raffanel, media@famm.org or 202-822-6700 for more information.  Learn more at www.famm.org.

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 September 18, 2013

52 Responses to “Reform Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Laws, Witnesses Tell Senate Committee”

  1. Walter

    Im very thankful of the big step we are taking on changing tha mandatory minimum sentencing but my question is what will be the next step after this hearing?

    Reply
  2. TaNesha Townsend

    I am very thrilled to hear about the new. My boyfriend just got sentenced to 7 years and with time already served and the drug program of 18 months that will not off time he will be home in 3 years. I was womdering will when all these changes take affect and will it be back dated. He got sentenced in May of 2013. Based on what he was charged with he automatically got 7 years. I need more information

    Reply
  3. Jessica

    I was able to watch the hearing from my desk and I am also very encouraged by the testamony given. I think the big question on everyone’s mind is ‘Now what?’ How soon can we expect the committee to take the next steps, and what exactly are the next steps?

    Reply
  4. shanika crane

    I think what you guys are doing is great so many lives are being affected because of this Mandatory Minimum.

    Reply
  5. Jimmy Hunsucker

    In dealing with these federal laws… one must take a look at such US supreme Court decisions such as the US vs. Lopez case. In that case the US Supreme Court ruled Congress exceeded it commerce authority. We also must go a little further back in history just prior to the Civil War. Northern Free States were using the Tenth Amendment, states Rights, and state nullification to outlaw The Federal Fugitive Slave Act. Our Founders set up a very limited federal government for numerous reasons. The US Constitution does not grant the power for the federal gov. to be exercising general police powers and prosecutions. Last week, under the Tenth Amendment, state Rights, and State Nullification, Missouri all but outlawed all federal gun laws.This is where I believe our main focus needs to be on. State Nullification of these unconstitutional federal laws. please visit (www.tenthamendmentcenter.com) Thank you.

    Reply
  6. Lisa Colon

    My man has done 5 years of his 10 year mandatory minimum sentence what will this mean for him ??? Is this a law that will effect his sentence ???

    Reply
  7. cormelia hawkins

    I think what famm are doing is a great thing to get these women & men back home sooner with there love ones because I feel as if they are non-violent drug offenders they deserve a lesser sentence.Thank everyone that is involved

    Reply
  8. RHONDAWILLIAMS

    will they go retro and will it help others that don’t have drug charges. and some people have inhanced sentencing, will this help them? thanks!

    Reply
  9. Marvina Whethers

    I’m very impressed on the steps that were taken today. How soon will the committee take the next steps. Basically, what are the next steps. I have my son who is facing 25 years. Please help!!

    Reply
  10. Gina

    Yes the next steps are extremely important. I have a very dear friend who has served 20 years of a life sentence and he is 47. There needs to be some relief for those in this situation. He could be a production citizen contributing.

    Reply
  11. Diane Sampson

    My husband just got sentenced to 8 years, what’s the next step and wlll it be retro or for new cases , he was incarcerated 9/2/13

    Reply
  12. Renee Smith

    Thank you FAMM for all your hard work and dedication. We appreciate everyone you do to help our love ones who are incarcerated.

    Reply
    • Anonymous

      My husband got a 20 year mandatory sentence in 2005 for just apparently 3 signed statements against him, no gun charges involved, so what are his chances of getting released sooner than his outdated now, he is considered a low level, he is in camp and still has about 10 more years to spend,,?????

      Reply
  13. jolene

    I think mandatory minimums are sad regardless if drugs are involved or not. I do not believe one fits all I think each case should be judged seperate and first time offenders should be considered. I feel it should affect federal crimes and state charges. I do strongly feel first time offenders should not get mandatory minimums.

    Reply
  14. Melanie Ervin

    I have been waiting 19 years to see some type of reform or the changing of the drug laws. My friend has served 19 years for conspiracy and sentenced to a life sentence, a first time offender. I look forward to one day these laws being change, I look forward to the day where paid informants are not used to lie to secure convictions of people with no violence in their crimes yet sentenced to laws that should be reserved for murder, rapist and child molesters.

    Reply
    • mimi

      Well said, Melanie! Imagine now the paid informant Is a drug addict with several priors who along with the DEA used a special needs (autism spectrum disorder) person to entrap the target, whom has disappeared and missing still, 3 yrs later. Mr.paid informant served 2 1/2 yrs and less than 2 months out tested dirty for opiates. Meanwhile Mr. autism is looking at 5 yrs mandatory minimum. Congress is responsible for allotting the power (not the right) into the hands of those who do nothing but abuse for their own agenda’s. It is all about money and power. Follow the money and you will find those who sleep well without a second thought towards justice and have sweet dreams upon the human sacrificial costs for power.

      Reply
    • bmornng jean

      yes this is so true i think to allow another person a informant to lie take away freedom from another person is very wrong and never should happen in the USA or any other.this is sad even worse for the so call informant/police to lie get what they want then lie again after knowingly did not read rights to my son ,and my son get ten yrs

      Reply
  15. Tawanna

    I am very grateful to have witnessed the hearing in regards to sentencing reform that is currently affecting several members of my family which include my mother, brother, fiance, and sister in law which are all facing very lengthy sentences of 10, 20, and 30 years to life for first time, low level, non-violent drug offenses and majority of them had no active role or personal gain in the offense they are being charged with, as a matter of fact my mother is a senior with mental illness and a host of other physical illnesses and has been struggling on SS disability for years, so does that speak for a drug king pin. Their situations are very similar to testimonies that I heard in today’s hearing and I can only hope and pray that change will come sooner than later because they do not deserve to spend the rest of their lives behind bars for a mistake in life. Someone please help my family and take a look at how decisions about human lives are being handled in North Dakota District Courts. I too am curious about if this hearing will bring forth legislative proposals and if so how soon.

    Reply
  16. Sydney. Perrizo

    I wanted to thank you for the participation in today’s hearing. Both Julie’s written testimony and those who were able to attend brought tears to my eyes and soothing to my torn apart heart. The hearing is a wonderful first baby step to reforming mandatory sentences. I know that any reforms take a long time to happen, but today gave me the first ray of hope that families will not, in the future, be ripped to shreds without hope by crazy, unjust mandatory enhancements and gun stacking laws that wipe out any vision of hope for a future life of those who have been sentenced under such current harsh laws.

    Reply
  17. Jessica Lopez

    I am hopeful that the sentiments expressed at this hearing will not fall on deaf ears. What’s the next step?

    Reply
  18. Shantina Gladden

    I was able to see the hearing today and I am very happy that this all is taking place. I think it is a long time coming there are so many low-level drug offenders with long prison sentences my fiance included. My fiance has career offender because of his past but never had a drug charge and recieved career offender he is currently sentenced to 17 years. I want to ask if he will be included in this change and when exactly will all this start happening? This as I said is a long time coming but lets not wait for 3-4 years go by before change start happening. As was noted today this money that is going to the BOP could very well goto good use by utilizing rehabilitation which I think that most drug offenders have an underlying drug problem from the start.

    Reply
  19. lois mostow and ruth kekkey

    is any of this going on cspan I need literature to give out at the court houses and when we visit the prisons….. we will re imburse for the postage..the copying is just costing too much $$$ a ..we are out of everything …great job Julie and everyone it is about time my friends and family in Canada,France UK and Australia are more aware than most americans are it is about time

    Reply
  20. Davada

    Is any of these changes going to help anyone other than drug offenders. I hope we will look at all cases individually and allow some good people who made bad choices to have another chance at their lives. I have come to realize over the last year that their is alot of good people in our prisons. Yes they made bad choices and have to take responsibility for that, but putting them in prison for these ridiculious amounts of time doesn’t help anyone. I now realize after having to watch my son be sentenced to 15 years for a bad choice that he made and stood up and took responsibility for has cost him and his 2 year old daughter not to mention the rest of his family more than nessecary. These are human beings and a one-size-fits all doesn’t work.

    Reply
  21. dezerae gravea

    I am very happy and exicited about the mandatory mininum being recognized. I have a loved one going through this manatory minimum now, I am very grateful of the success famm has achieved. I wish the best and I support famm.

    Reply
  22. Jaime Mills

    My son was wrongly accused sentenced to life plus ten years he has been in prison for 15 years. There is not one oz. of evidence to prove his quilt but there’s DNA to prove his innocence.
    Tax payers are paying for his keep. What I’m asking is wouldn’t it be cheeper to test the DNA evidence and let him come home.

    Reply
  23. RAYMOND I. DUENAS

    I AM FROM THE ISLAND OF GUAM IN THE SOUTH PACIFIC. MY WIFE AND I WERE FOUND QUILTY IN TRIAL AFTER REFUSING TO TAKE A 20 YEAR PLEA DEAL. I WAS SENTENCED FOR 25 YEARS AND MY WIFE (LOURDES C. DUENAS) WAS SENTENCED TO 20YEARS. MY CONVICTION WAS OVER TURNED AND VACATED BY THE 9TH CIRCUIT COURT OF HAWAII. MY WIFE NOT SO LUCKY. SHE IS A NON-VIOLENT DRUG OFFENDER FACING 20 YEARS DUE TO MANDATORY MIN. I’M NOW ON GUAM FACING A RE-TRIAL BUT MY WIFE STILL SITS IN PRISON ON A 20YEAR SENTENCE. WITH THIS HEARING NOW OVER. I PRAY SOMETHING GOOD IS COMING FOR MY WIFES SAKE. SHE DOSN’T DESERVE TO BE LOCKED UP FOR TWENTY YEARS. OUR US PROSECUTORS HERE ON GUAM THRIVE ON USING MANDATORY MIN. IF WE DO NOT TAKE PLEA DEALS OR ASSIST THEM ON MAKING DRUG ARRESTS. WHICH IS A PRACTICE THEY DO ON OUR ISLAND. IT IS OUT RIGHT INJUSTICE. GUAM NEEDS ATTENTION AND GUAM NEEDS HELP ON FIGHTING STRONG MANDATORY SENTENCING PRACTICES FORCED BY US PROSECUTORS. GUAM NEEDS A CHANGE. SENTENCING REFORM IS NEEDED FOR ALL !!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  24. marie

    I am very excited, I think everything you guys are doing is wonderful I pray to God this changes soon. Are family has been destroyed due to these mandatory sentence.

    Reply
  25. Sharo

    I don’t believe in a blanketed reprimanding or consequence style system like mandatory minimums. It is my firm belief that the punishment should fit the crime. How many things have changed since the 80’s? Hairstyles, cars, technology healthcare and most everything you touch, see and feel. And yet, the one thing we need reformed the most remains the same – mandatory minimums. We need to behave like a society that knows the difference between right and wrong, and when someone is in the wrong the corrective action should be family intervention, education and rehabilitation not a ridiculous amount of time behind bars. Furthermore prisons have become somewhat of a breeding ground in furthering criminal activity and perpetuating the cycle. As a modern society and a country leading the way in human rights we need to set the example that we will not tolerate criminal activity but we will also not set a ‘one size fits all’ punishment. We need immediate remediation and susatainable change, period.

    Reply
  26. gg

    THATS GREAT NEWS ABOUT MANDATORY MINIMUMS,BUT WILL IT HELP THE PRISONERS ALREADY SENTENCED AND SERVING 20 YRS FOR DRUGS,AND WHAT WILL IT DO TO HELP STATE PRISONERS BC ALL I HEAR THEM TALKING ABOUT IS FEDERAL PRISON BUT SOME PEOPLE IN STATE PRISON GOT THAT DISADVANTAGE UNDER MANDATORY MINIMUMS TOO.

    Reply
  27. Frankie Mays

    I am so grateful To you guys for all the love and support Also for standing up for what just right and fare It helps people to see that justice is equal Keep up the good work And I will continue to Support you.

    Reply
  28. Isabella

    I am please with the fact that these changes are being made, and that anyone from here forward will benefit from them. However, I feel that we need to really sink our teeth into the Minimum Mandatory Laws that will also b help everyone that has already been sentenced. My daughter is sitting in prison for Conspiracy charges and she was not even present for the crime, but she had knowledge. She eneded up with just as much time as the co-defendents who did participate in the crime. She has served 5 years of a 16.8 year sentence. The laws have to become retroactive as well in an attempt to help the ones that are just sitting in prision for all of those years.

    Reply
  29. NAN EISENBERG

    I PRAY THAT THESE PUBLIC SERVANTS WILL SEE THIS THROUGH TO REVISE/ADJUST THIS MANDATORY MINIMUM FOR NON-VIOLENT, CARING AND LOVING FAMILY MEMBERS – ESP. – MEMBERS OF OUR SOCIETY WHO HAVE BEEN SO WRONGED. EVEN THOUGH OUR JUDGE SAID CHARGES SHOULD HAVE BEEN DROPPED AND 10 YEAR SENTENCE WAS WRONG, HIS HANDS WERE TIED AND HE HAD TO IMPOSE IT = RIPPING MY GRANDSON FROM HIS 3 LITTLE ONES WHO HAD NEVER BEEN AWAY FROM HIM….I WILL BE DEAD WHEN HE COMES HOME.
    GOD BLESS e v e r y o n e TRYING TO RIGHT THIS WRONG.

    Reply
  30. Domonique

    my husband is serving 15 years for ghost dope n the fed im so hurt n its so hard please god help

    Reply
    • Melanie Ervin

      Dominique, the man who would have been my husband was charged and convicted for “ghost dope”. I always tell people he was no angel but he also was not the “kingpin” they made him out to be. It’s sad that the government is so corrupt from Washington to Wall Street, they lie, cheat and steal and are never held accountable. Then they send these corrupt paid informants into communities that destroy lives. My friend has lost 19 years of his life, he has lost his mother, father brother and has watched ALL of his children grown into adults. It’s so sad……

      Reply
  31. Janie Casey

    I am so thankful for all of you that could attend and fight for those of us that couldn’t be there. I am praying for all of this to be retroactive.

    Reply
  32. linda

    get involved…if you want change…you have to get involved. write, call, visit your state representatives congress people and senators. Tell them you want change. BE A REGISTERED VOTER! the more the people get involved the more they HAVE to listen. there is power in numbers..the power is in YOUR hands…..the squeaky wheel gets oiled…..
    linda

    Reply
  33. ANGELA

    IM PRAYING FOR THE RETROACTIVE,MY HUSBAND IS IN FEDERAL LOCK UP SERVING A 10 AND HAVE SERVED 7 YEARS ALREADY JUST TO GET OUT AND STILL BE ON 8 YEAR PAPER..I DONT UNDERTSAND PLS HELP…GOD BLESS ALL THE FAMILIYS AND FAMM YOU ALL ARE GREAT…GOD IS IN CONTROL.AMEN

    Reply
  34. Julia

    My eldest son has been incarcerated for six years now and this has had a devastating effect on my life. I recently suffered the great loss of my mother and needed the assistance of my child. My son was a huge part of his grandmothers life and she would come from Florida every year to see him. My son is incarcerated on the mandatory minimum requirement that is currently being revised. My son is a good hardworking man that would better serve the community in a positive upstanding capacity if he were at home. I know that
    He had to serve time for his wrongdoing but I’ve witnessed cases that have caused a loss of life serve less time. My son has served a great amount of time in the overcrowded system , my son has had his life threatened and has been ill from what normally would not be so infectious here at home but due to living in These abhorrent conditions a simple upper respiratory infection then becomes a full blown asthma attack. I grieve everyday for my child he is in an overcrowded unhealthy prison and he is so far away from his family. I have a younger son and daughter that love and miss their brother as much as I.
    Having him released would be a miracle for our family and a godsend from above. My son has a trade in which he will be working immediately upon release and contributing to society. If he were released he would have a chance to begin living , working and helping his family.
    Sincerely ,
    Julia valdez
    “A mother which yearns for her firstborn son to be home “

    Reply
  35. Arlene Guerrero

    my husband is arrested since 2008 in a federal prison in Puerto Rico, was sentenced to 12 years, but the judge told him only since 2009, so basically gave him one year to the government, and his lawyer recommended him not to fight this year. all the days I pray for a miracle. I feel very sad..

    Reply
  36. michelle

    to:famm,thank you/to:anyone in office i say save your cells for kingpins, killers,rapist,child pedifiles,true criminals,if you like manditory ,sentence drug users/dealers make drug treatment manditory ,go ahead give users 5years of treatment i truely think instead of 15 to life,5years of manditory treatment should help these moms and dads come home sober and be able to still have a chance to survive,i was 90pounds on meth my mom gave me ” rehabb” now im alive i have my family back,my kids if i had gone to prison my family might be here !im clean and sobber all people who have not commited violent crimes need a chance we are human.the man who molested me 15years ago is still molesting childrenhe has had 13victems he is in lubbockhe molested2four year olds recently he is listed as moderate risK!!!!!!!!!!!WHEN HE MOLESTED ME THAT WAS NOT MODERATE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! maybe there is no room for preditors?if a president can parden a killer ,why cant a president change laws to fit their crimes?

    Reply
  37. lydia from lubbock,tx

    thank you famm for this oppertunity,all we have done is cry with no hope , now we at least have hope!for politicians,lawmakers,judges,we beg you tocarefully acess each case as though you are considering how each mom,dad,son,daughter,one day gets out of prison to the streets!in cases that you are dealing with NON-VIOLENT drug-addictes/drug dealers who for the most part are working for the true kingpins that run our streets,mostly never convicted because the little people are sentenced for them they know better than to snitch!we beg you to convert 1or 2 prisons into drug rehabb TREATMNENT CENTERS go ahead make them MANDITORY 1to5years should treat most drug users,please condider this after rehabb a mommy or daddy comes home and when asked “where were you all these years they say rehabb!’you or i will allow them in our house or give them a job if they say “I WAS IN PRISON FOR 15YEARS to LIFE ” we all know we WILL NOT give these people a job !!!!!!!!!!!!! non-violent people who turned to drugs need HELP this is the unitedstates our people are bieng locked up like animals instead of being treated!!!!!!!!!!!come on where is wrong with us lets all speakk up and make changes LEAVE THE PRISONS TO TRUE CRIMINALS,kingpins,killers ,rapist,LETS HELP AND TREAT NON_VIOLENT DRUG-DEALING USERS SAY THE CELLS FOR VIOLENT PEOPLE,SAVE TAX PAYERS MONEY FOR TREATMENT CENTERs!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

    Reply
  38. Ann

    FAMM, I appreciate your diligent hard work for people in similar situations as mine, thank you. My son was left in McKinney county jail for almost two years for a small drug related case, & a cousin of his & some others lied & turn states evidence that my son was trafficking drugs with them, big lie, & the feds took up the case & sentenced him to one hundred & eighty months in federal prison. It took me time to process in my mine setting there in court the amount of time they had given my son. That was devastating to know that my son would be in prison, being verbally, physically, & sexually abused. He has presently been inside now for almost seven years & the cousin that said he got his drugs from my son, was released early out of prison because he had never been in any trouble with the law. He didn’t even stay out six months & back in jail for drug trafficking again. I don’t hold to any wrong doing & taught my son daily right from wrong & if you break the law you have to pay the consequences, but where is the justice in these petty crimes giving these young men & women maximum sentences? Like myself & probably many others I’ve been laid off from my job for almost seven months & I don’t have the funds to get my son legal counsel. I pray as I always do that the LORD JESUS, will move on men & women hearts to learn how to judge righteous judgment. Learn to show some mercy, as GOD, did for the entire human race who was guilty, yet sent HIS SON, JESUS CHRIST, to pay the penalty of sin for us all.

    Reply
  39. Jessica

    My husband is a first time offender who was sentenced on November 2012. He was sentenced to 5 years. I hope the reduction for mandatory sentences happens soon. We have a 2 year old who misses her dad and nothing would be better than to have him home with us and for him to watch his daughter grow. No matter what I know I will be there for my husband :)

    Reply
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  41. Teresa Aviles

    I was with great pleasure and a generous grant from The November Coalition that I was able to attend the hearing on September 18, 2013. I came away with the thought that they are finally hearing what we have been saying for the past twenty (20) years…it is past time to put some common sense in sentencing. Although is a little and much to late for myself and my family it seems that FINALLY something is going to happen. I just hope that it will happen in my lifetime. If and when it does, I will be there.

    Teresa Aviles
    In loving memory of Isidro Aviles (my first born) who passed away in federal prison while serving a long, harsh, cruel and inhumane sentence due to mandatory minimum drug laws.

    Reply
  42. anonomous

    FAMM thank you for all you do. I had never heard of you before but maybe it was because this was not a topic I was interested till now. My husband was just sentenced to 12 years in prison. He took his case to trial and was found guilty the second time around. The first was a mistrial, there was no real evidence against him except an informant who happened to be a family member that we loved very dearly but who was trying to get out of trouble himself. My husband did not commit a crime but he was guilt by association. Even though my family members testified on my husband’s behalf and told of how this family member had admitted to them that my husband was innocent, that did not make a difference. I am so disappointed in our justice system, I got to witness first hand how dirt the prosecution can be in order to get what they want. That family member got off with nothing but probation, the thing that gets to me the most is he had been convicted years ago and according to laws, should have been given 10 years mandatory, of course liars (informants) get off easier. How is it that this man who already had a record got off with probation but my husband who has always been law abiding got so much time. At the end, the judge gave him extra time for perjury, it turns out that if you try to defend yourself and are found guilty, you get punished even more. Just because he lost the trial he was also called a liar, what happened to a fair trial. Just an fyi, anyone who is thinking of going to trial better think twice before defending yourself. I hope there is change and that it helps my husband and many others who’s lives have been so affected by this injustice.

    Reply
    • Duke

      I’ve seen this same thing happen in my family. The Feds came into our town, paid guilty drug dealers to change their stories with the promise of freedom . Knowing that a person cannot trust the Feds, a person wore a wire while meeting with two FBI agents in Tulsa, OK. I have a transcript (and the audio tape ) of the two FBI agents telling someone to lie under oath..on the stand. The problems is, no one cares. These two agents were moved to different states..that’s all. The Fed. DA from Little Rock knew this happened, but did nothing about it…they just wanted to win their case. it is sickening to say the least.

      Reply
  43. Cocoa

    Im very thankful for FAMM!! I hope this involves state prisoners also.. my fiancé is currently serving an 8 year sentence with the 85% rule, he made a bad choice one night that will never be forgotten, this was his first time offense.. I pray this goes though I miss him very much! PRAYING for God to shine down on this!!

    Reply
  44. Susan

    My husband is currently serving a 34 month sentence for selling drugs. a bad choice during hard times. A first time non violent offender. Now he had gotten the 2 points for cooperating with his case. My question is with the new amendment 775 to us sentencing guidelines that past November 1st 2013 it now states that if they take a guilty plea also and avoid costly trial it gives a 1 level reduction. Does this go into effect now and should I talk to a lawyer about it or will it not make a difference?

    Reply
  45. Lysi

    I absolutely agree with the mandatory drug law, does anybody know where this laws stands now or the progress of it, please let me know? Also when Will it actually go in effect?

    Reply
  46. senora cotton

    im excited but im not ganna have my hopes up cause the goverment changes their minds everyday. my childrens father is serving 15yrs fed time. his family misses him so so so very much. he wasnt a bad man just wasnt smart with certain decisions but regardless we never judged him and will continue to love you. we just pray that you come back home.

    Reply

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