Law Enforcement

law-enforcement-officers

Increasingly, police, prosecutors, and correctional officials are supporting mandatory minimum sentencing reform. Police and prosecutors recognize that using mandatory minimum prison sentences for nonviolent offenders drains limited funds from law enforcement budgets. Correctional officials are advocating for reform because mandatory minimum sentences have produced dangerously overcrowded prisons that undermine rehabilitation. Law enforcement are supportive not only of reforming mandatory minimum sentences, but also of using smarter, more cost-effective probation, treatment, and rehabilitative sentencing options that reduce crime and keep the public safe.


Resources

Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration

How Federal Mandatory Minimums for Nonviolent Drug Offenders Make us Less Safe

Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates: Why We Don’t Need Mandatory Minimums to Get Guilty Pleas (speech, July 22, 2015)

 

American Correctional Association’s Resolution Supporting Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Reform

America Correctional Association’s Public Correctional Policy on Sentencing

Council of Prison Locals, American Federation of Government Employees, AFL-CIO, Statement to U.S. House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, supporting federal mandatory minimum sentencing reform

Law Enforcement and Victim Support for the Smarter Sentencing Act (S. 1410/H.R. 3382, 113th Congress):

S. 1410 Potential Impact and Cost Savings

Summary of the Smarter Sentencing Act, S. 1410

Why Law Enforcement Support the Smarter Sentencing Act

Association of Prosecuting Attorneys

Former Prosecutors and Judges 

International Union of Police Associations, AFL-CIO

Council of Prison Locals 33

American Federation of Government Employees, AFL-CIO

National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women

General Resources:

Quick Facts

What the Experts Say

What the Public Thinks: public opinion polls show that the public supports reducing sentences and using smarter, more cost-effective punishments for nonviolent drug offenders

Current Sentencing Reform Efforts in Congress

Current Sentencing Reform Efforts in Florida and other states

Factsheet: Alternatives to Incarceration in a Nutshell 


Latest Stories

December 12, 2013

Overcriminalization Undermines Respect for Legal System

(Washington Times op-ed) — Despite some of the sharpest political divisions in memory, Congress managed to mount one noteworthy bipartisan effort this year. Since May, the Over-criminalization Task Force, comprising five Republicans and five Democrats from the House Judiciary Committee, has worked diligently to develop recommendations that will address some of the fundamental problems plaguing… Read more »


December 5, 2013

The Threat of Severe Prison Sentences Forces Guilty Pleas in Drug Cases

(Human Rights Watch Release) — Federal prosecutors routinely threaten extraordinarily severe prison sentences to coerce drug defendants into waiving their right to trial and pleading guilty, Human Rights Watch said in a report released today. In the rare cases in which defendants insist on going to trial, prosecutors make good on their threats. Federal drug… Read more »


December 3, 2013

Does the Attorney General Mean What He Says About Sentencing Reform?

(The Atlantic) — When the justices of the United States Supreme Court confer Friday morning to consider new cases they will have the opportunity to accept for review a dispute that tests not just the meaning of their own recent Sixth Amendment precedent but the viability of a major new policy initiative implemented this summer… Read more »