Law Enforcement

law-enforcement-officers

Increasingly, police, prosecutors, and correctional officials are supporting mandatory minimum sentencing reform. Police and prosecutors recognize that using mandatory minimum prison sentences for nonviolent offenders drains limited funds from law enforcement budgets. Correctional officials are advocating for reform because mandatory minimum sentences have produced dangerously overcrowded prisons that undermine rehabilitation. Law enforcement are supportive not only of reforming mandatory minimum sentences, but also of using smarter, more cost-effective probation, treatment, and rehabilitative sentencing options that reduce crime and keep the public safe.

Advocacy

Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration

Deputy Attorney General Sally Yates: Why We Don’t Need Mandatory Minimums to Get Guilty Pleas (speech, July 22, 2015)

American Correctional Association’s Resolution Supporting Mandatory Minimum Sentencing Reform

America Correctional Association’s Public Correctional Policy on Sentencing

Council of Prison Locals, American Federation of Government Employees, AFL-CIO, Statement to U.S. House Subcommittee on Crime, Terrorism, Homeland Security, and Investigations, supporting federal mandatory minimum sentencing reform

Law Enforcement and Victim Support for the Smarter Sentencing Act (S. 1410/H.R. 3382, 113th Congress):

S. 1410 Potential Impact and Cost Savings

Summary of the Smarter Sentencing Act, S. 1410

Why Law Enforcement Support the Smarter Sentencing Act

Association of Prosecuting Attorneys

Former Prosecutors and Judges 

International Union of Police Associations, AFL-CIO

Council of Prison Locals 33

American Federation of Government Employees, AFL-CIO

National Task Force to End Sexual and Domestic Violence Against Women

General Resources:

Quick Facts

Factsheet: Alternatives to Incarceration in a Nutshell 

How Federal Mandatory Minimums for Nonviolent Drug Offenders Make us Less Safe

What the Experts Say

What the Public Thinks

Current Sentencing Reform Efforts in Florida and other states


Latest Stories

March 6, 2017

People In Houston Are No Longer Going To Jail For Marijuana Possession

Originally seen in The Huffington Post.  Beginning on Wednesday, people who are caught with small amounts of marijuana in Harris County, Texas, will no longer earn a trip to jail. Under the new policy, announced last month, police in Texas’ most populous county will instead offer four-hour drug education classes to anybody found with less… Read more »


March 6, 2017

Tough On Crime

Originally seen in Slate. Some of the most decorated police officials and prosecutors in the country want to convince President Donald Trump that his ideas about law enforcement are wrong. The group—which formed in 2015 under the name Law Enforcement Leaders to Reduce Crime and Incarceration—has produced a policy memo that is being delivered to… Read more »


March 6, 2017

San Diego a model for crime prevention programs

Complete article found via The San Diego Union-Tribune In my five decades of experience in law enforcement — from beat cop to police chief of San Diego, Richmond and San Jose — the biggest lesson I learned is there are smarter ways to improve public safety than simply locking people up for long periods of time…. Read more »